Print failure and filament jam.

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Print failure and filament jam.

Postby DeaconBlue57 » Fri Aug 26, 2016 4:54 am

I tried printing a model and walked away. when I returned the print had failed and a huge blob of green filament was all around the extruder tip. What a mess. Unfortunately I didn't know how bad it was. After I thought I had cleaned it up I continued to print another model or two. Eventually another print failed an caused a filament jam that I couldn't clear. This time I saw a little more green filament around the extruder tip again. I removed the extruder and used pliers to remove the glob. When I pulled it off the metal plate around the extruder tip popped off. Then I noticed the real problem. The glob of filament had oozed under the metal plate into the extruder chamber. This caused failure of any more prints. After carefully removing the rest of the glob n the extruder I had a horrible time cleaning the filament jam that it caused. I did finally get it cleared. This was a real learning experience and taught me to inspect the extruder more closely when ever I get a jam. Also if you ever get a glob of filament around the extruder tip from a failed print make sure to check the tip and under the metal base plate for more filament. If you don't you may burn up your extruder and then have a costly repair. Fortunately I found the problem in time and everything is running smoothly now.

I tried to upload some pictures but keep getting this error message. "The file is too big, maximum allowed size is 256 KiB." REALLY? none of my .jpg files are that small. What's up with that?

I think I will post the .jpeg files on the prints and projects page if anyone is interested in seeing my green glob.
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Re: Print failure and filament jam.

Postby 3dtech » Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:28 pm

Before you start: Cold pulls with a bowden tube can be tricky so if you’re using a bowden extruder, remove the tube and any material in the tube before you start. After you are finished the cold pull, put the bowden tube back in.

Step 1: Heat the nozzle to printing temperature and manually feed about 10cm of filament through the hot end (where the bowden tube was). Try and keep the filament as straight as possible. Natural or clear coloured filament works best so you can see the residue when you pull it out. If your hot end is too clogged to get anything out of the hot end, take a thin wire and a pair of plyers and stick it into the tip of the nozzle to clear the blockage.

Step 2: Once you have some filament coming out of the nozzle, bring the nozzle temperature down (120C for ABS, 90C for PLA, and 100-140 for Nylon). Try to use the lowest temperature possible for this step. It should be hot enough that the filament is malleable but not so hot that it is too soft. Be sure to cut any filament off that is dripping from the nozzle before you start the pull. Before you start: Cold pulls with a bowden tube can be tricky so if you’re using a bowden extruder, remove the tube and any material in the tube before you start. After you are finished the cold pull, put the bowden tube back in.3d printing chennai mumbai pune india




Step 1: Heat the nozzle to printing temperature and manually feed about 10cm of filament through the hot end (where the bowden tube was). Try and keep the filament as straight as possible. Natural or clear coloured filament works best so you can see the residue when you pull it out. If your hot end is too clogged to get anything out of the hot end, take a thin wire and a pair of plyers and stick it into the tip of the nozzle to clear the blockage.



Step 2: Once you have some filament coming out of the nozzle, bring the nozzle temperature down (120C for ABS, 90C for PLA, and 100-140 for Nylon). Try to use the lowest temperature possible for this step. It should be hot enough that the filament is malleable but not so hot that it is too soft. Be sure to cut any filament off that is dripping from the nozzle before you start the pull.



Step 3: Pull on the top of the filament until you feel it start to slowly give out. If it comes out too easily and there is no residue on the end, lower the temperature. If you have trouble pulling it out, raise the temperature until it does.
Step 3: Pull on the top of the filament until you feel it start to slowly give out. If it comes out too easily and there is no residue on the end, lower the temperature. If you have trouble pulling it out, raise the temperature until it does.
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